2013 ΛΗΨΗ ΑΡΧΕΙΟY

Emergency Telephone Numbers

Emergency Police Service: 22420 22100
Tourist Police:22420 26666 Ambulance 22420 22300
Kos Hospital:22420 28050, 22420 23423
Fire Department:22420 22199

 

Tourist services

Airport Ticket & Reservations Dept.: 22420 51567
Hoteliers Association: 22420 26883, 22420 24955
Union of Apartment Owners: 22420 26393

 

Port authorities

Kos: 22420 26594, 22420 26595

 

Tourist Information Offices

Kos Tourist Information: 22420 24460, 22420 28724
Mastichari Tourist Information: 22420 49508
Kardamena Tourist Information: 22420 49508
Kefalos Tourist Information: 22420 49509

 

 Archaeological Services

Asklepieion: 22420 28763
Archaeological Museum: 22420 28326
Roman House (Casa Romana): 22420 23234

 

Transportation

Inter City Bus (KTEL): 22420 22292, 22420 20263
Taxi Station of Kos (24 hour service): 22420 22777, 23333
Mini Train Tours: 22420 26276
Inner City Bus (DEAS): 22420 26276

 

KTEL - KOS S.A.  

Kleopatras 7, Kos
Τel: 22420 - 22292 - Fax: 22420 - 20263 
E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | Website: www.ktel-kos.gr


  

Local Bus Schedules
VALID from: 1/11/2017

Departures from Kos

Monday to

Friday 

Weekend

One Way Ticket

Departures
from Villages

Monday to

Friday

Weekend

 


From KOS to ZIA

07:00

-

 


2,10 €

 


From ZIA to KOS

07:30

-

 

 

-

13:00

13:30

-

 

 

 

-
   

 

 
   

 

 

 

 



From KOS to TIGAKI

 

               

 

 

 


2,10 €

 

 



From TIGAKI to KOS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 







From KOS to MARMARI

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,10 €

 





From MARMARI to KOS 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 



From KOS to PILI

07:00

07:00


2,10 €

 

From PILI to KOS

07:30 07:30

10:00

-

10:20 -

13:00

13:00

13:20 13:20

 

 

16:10

 

 

 


From KOS to MASTICHARI

 

 



 

3,20 €



 

 

From MASTICHARI to KOS

08:00

 08:40

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

13:00

13:00

 

 

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20:30

 

16:00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

From KOS to ANTIMACHIA

 

 

 

3,20 €

From ANTIMACHIA to KOS

07:55

08:30 

13:00

13:00

15:50 

 

20:30

 

 

 





From KOS to KARDAMENA

 

 

 




3,50 €

        




From KARDAMENA to KOS

07:50

08:25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

-

13:00

13:00

15:40

 

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20:30

     

 

     

 

 
From KOS to PARADISE-
KEFALOS

 

 

 

 

4,80 €

 

 

From KEFALO-PARADISE to KOS

07:30

08:00

 

-

 

 

13:00

13:00

 

-

 

 

15:15

 

 

 

 

 

20:30

   

 

 

 NOTICE:

You Should Always Buy Your Tickets On the Bus.

 

 

Κos Island


View Map in large view


Kos or Cos (Greek: Κως) is a Greek island in the south Sporades group of the Dodecanese, next to the Gulf of Gökova/Cos. The island measures 40 kilometres (25 mi) by 8 kilometres (5.0 mi), and is 4 kilometres (2.5 mi) from the coast of Bodrum, Turkey, and the ancient region of Caria. The island forms a separate municipality within the Kos regional unit, which is part of the South Aegean region. The principal town of the island and seat of the municipality is Kos town. The island has a population of 30,947.

Name


Throughout its history, the island has been known by the Greek, Kos. A person from Kos is called a "Koan" in English. The word is also a possessive, as in "Koan goods".Kos has also been called İstanköy by the Ottomans and Coo by the Italians and was formerly known as Stanchio in English.







History


In the Roman mythology, the island was visited by Hercules.
The island was originally colonised by the Carians. A contingent from Kos participated in the War of Troy The Dorians invaded it in the 11th century BC, establishing a Dorian colony with a large contingent of settlers from Epidaurus, whose Asclepius cult made their new home famous for its sanatoria. The other chief sources of the island's wealth lay in its wines and, in later days, in its silk manufacture.

Its early history–as part of the religious-political amphictyony that included Lindos, Kamiros, Ialysos, Cnidus and Halicarnassus, the Dorian Hexapolis (Greek for six cities),–is obscure. At the end of the 6th century, Kos fell under Achaemenid domination but rebelled after the Greek victory at Cape Mykale in 479. During the Greco-Persian Wars, when it twice expelled the Persians, it was ruled by tyrants, but as a rule it seems to have been under oligarchic government. In the 5th century, it joined the Delian League, and, after the revolt of Rhodes, it served as the chief Athenian station in the south-eastern Aegean (411–407). In 366 BC, a democracy was instituted. After helping to weaken Athenian power, in the Social War (357-355 BC), it fell for a few years to the king Mausolus of Caria. In 366 BC, the capital was transferred from Astypalaia to the newly built town of Kos, laid out in a Hippodamian grid.

Proximity to the east gave the island first access to imported silk thread. Aristotle (384 BC-322 BC) mentions silk weaving conducted by the women of the island.Silk production of garments was conducted in large factories by women slaves.

In the Hellenistic age, Kos attained the zenith of its prosperity. Its alliance was valued by the kings of Egypt, who used it as a naval outpost to oversee the Aegean. As a seat of learning, it arose as a provincial branch of the museum of Alexandria, and became a favorite resort for the education of the princes of the Ptolemaic dynasty. Among its most famous sons were the physician Hippocrates, the painter Apelles, the poets Philitas and, perhaps, Theocritus.

Kos was also known as Meropis and Nymphæa. Diodorus Siculus (xv. 76) and Strabo (xiv. 657) describe it as a well-fortified port. Its position gave it a high importance in Ægean trade; while the island itself was rich in wines of considerable fame (Pliny, xxxv. 46). Under Alexander III of Macedon and the Egyptian Ptolemies(from 336 B.C.) the town developed into one of the great centers in the Ægean; Josephus ("Ant." xiv. 7, § 2) quotes Strabo to the effect that Mithridates[disambiguation needed] was sent to Kos to fetch the gold deposited there by the queen Cleopatra of Egypt. Herod is said to have provided an annual stipend for the benefit of prize-winners in the athletic games (Josephus, "B. J." i. 21, § 11), and a statue was erected there to his son Herod the Tetrarch ("C. I. G." 2502 ). Paul briefly visited here according to (Acts 21:1).

Except for occasional incursions by corsairs and some severe earthquakes, the island has rarely had its peace disturbed. Following the lead of its great neighbour, Rhodes, Kos generally displayed a friendly attitude toward the Romans; in 53 AD it was made a free city. Lucian (125–180) mentions their manufacture of semi-transparent light dresses, a fashion success.

The island was later conquered by the Venetians, who then sold it to the Knights Hospitaller of Rhodes (the Knights of St John) in 1315. Two hundred years later the Knights faced the threat of a Turkish invasion and abandoned the island to the Ottoman Empire in 1523. The Ottomans ruled Kos for 400 years until it was transferred to Italy in 1912. In World War II, the island was taken over by the Axis powers. It was occupied by Italian troops until the Italian surrender in 1943. British and German forces then clashed for control of the island in the Battle of Kos, in which the Germans were victorious. German troops occupied the island until 1945, when it became a protectorate of the United Kingdom, who ceded it to Greece in 1947.

Geography


The island is part of a chain of mountains from which it became separated after earthquakes and subsidence that occurred in ancient times. These mountains include Kalymnos and Kappari which are separated by an underwater chasm c. 70 m (40 fathoms deep), as well as the volcano of Nisyros and the surrounding islands.

There is a wide variety of rocks in Kos which is related to its geographical formation. Prominent among these are the Quaternary layers in which the fossil remains of mammals such as horses, hippopotami and elephants have been found. The fossilised molar of an elephant of gigantic proportions was presented to the Paleontology Museum of the University of Athens.

The shores of Kos Island are washed by the waters of the Aegean Sea. Its coastline is 112 km long and is caressed by long immaculate beaches, leading to its main industry being tourism. Farming is the principal occupation of many of the island's inhabitants, with their main crops being grapes, almonds, figs, olives, and tomatoes, along with wheat and corn. Cos lettuce may be grown here, but the name is unrelated.

The main villages of Kos island are Kardamena, Kefalos, Tingaki, Antimachia, Mastihari, Marmari and Pyli. Smaller ones are Zia, Zipari, Platani, Lagoudi and Asfendiou.

Culture


The main port and population centre on the island, also called Kos, is also the tourist and cultural centre, with whitewashed buildings including many hotels, restaurants and a small number of nightclubs forming the famous Kos town "barstreet". The town has a 14th century fortress at the entrance to its harbour, erected in 1315 by The Knights of Saint John of Rhodes.

The ancient physician Hippocrates is thought to have been born on Kos, and in the center of the town is the Plane Tree of Hippocrates, a dream temple where the physician is traditionally supposed to have taught. The limbs of the now elderly tree are supported by scaffolding. The small city is also home to the International Hippocratic Institute and the Hippocratic Museum dedicated to him. Near the Institute are the ruins of Asklepieion, where Herodicus taught Hippocrates medicine. Kardamena is a popular resort for young British holidaymakers and has a large number of bars and nightclubs.

Religion


The main religion practiced is Greek Orthodoxy. Kos has one of the four cathedrals in the entire Dodecanese. There is also a Roman Catholic church on the island as well as a Mosque catering to the Muslim community of Kos. The Synagogue is no longer used for religious ceremonies as the Jewish community of Kos was practically wiped out by the Nazis in World War II. It has, however, been restored and is maintained with all religious symbols intact and is now used by the Municipality of Kos for various events, mainly cultural.

KTEL - KOS SA 

Kleopatras 7, Κως 
Τel: 22420 - 22292 - Fax: 22420 - 20263 
E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | Website: www.ktel-kos.gr


 
Airport Buses

From KOS to MASTICHARI - AIRPORT

VALID FROM: 1/11/2017 

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

 

           

 

           

 

           

13:00

13:00

13:00

13:00

13:00

13:00

13:00

 

           

 

           

 

           

20:30

20:30

20:30

20:30

20:30

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
             

    One Way Ticket

3,20 €

Bus to the Airport will be at Mastichari port
approximately 25 minutes after the departure from Kos town.

From AIRPORT to MASTICHARI - KOS

 VALID FROM: 1/11/2017

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

07:55

07:55

07:55

07:55

07:55 

08:30

08:30

 

           

 

         

 

 

           

15:45

15:45

15:45

15:45

15:45

 

 

         

 

 
         

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
         

 

 
         

 

 

 

From AIRPORT to KEFALOS

Monday to Friday

 

 

13:35

 

 

21:05 

Weekend

 

-

13:35

-

 

 

One Way Ticket

2.00 €

From KEFALOS to AIRPORT

Monday to Friday

07:30

 

 

15:15

 

-

Weekend

08:00

 

-

 

-

 

 

From AIRPORT to KARDAMENA

Monday to Friday

 

 

 

13:35

 

 

 

21:05 

Weekend

 

 

-

13:35

-

 

 

 

One Way Ticket

2.00 €

From KARDAMENA to AIRPORT

Monday to Friday

07:50

 

 

15:40

 

 

 

 

Weekend

08:25

 

-

 

-